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Download File Saher.rar ^NEW^


It renames files by appending "..MaxSteel.Saher Blue Eagle" as the filename extensions. For example, "1.jpg" would be renamed to "1.jpg..MaxSteel.Saher Blue Eagle", "2.jpg" to "2.jpg..MaxSteel.Saher Blue Eagle", and so on.




Download File saher.rar



The pop-up window (displayed by Saher Blue Eagle in full screen mode) states that all files have been encrypted and can be recovered with a password, which can be purchased for 0.812 Bitcoin. Payment must be made by transferring this cryptocurrency sum to the provided Bitcoin wallet address.


In most cases, only the cyber criminals behind ransomware attacks hold valid decryption tools (in this particular case, a password). Unfortunately, there are currently no third-party tools that can decrypt files that are compromised by this ransomware, however, paying the ransom does not guarantee that developers of the installed ransomware will send any decryption tools. Therefore, victims are advised to restore files from an available backup.


Victims cannot generally decrypt files without tools held only by developers of the installed ransomware, unless in rare cases the ransomware is not finished, contains bugs/flaws, etc. Therefore, maintain backups on remote servers (such as Cloud) or unplugged storage devices.


Typically, ransomware and other malware is distributed through malspam campaigns, fake software updating tools, untrusted download sources, unofficial (third-party) software activation tools and Trojans. Users infect computers with malware when they open malicious files that they receive via email.


Typically, these emails contain malicious attachments or websites designed to download dangerous files. In most cases, cyber criminals send emails that have Microsoft Office documents, archive files (ZIP, RAR), PDF documents, JavaScript files, and executable files such as .exe attached to them. Fake software updating tools do not update or fix any installed software - they simply install malware instead.


They can also infect systems by exploiting bugs/flaws of outdated software. Examples of dubious file/software download channels are Peer-to-Peer networks such as torrent clients, eMule, various free file hosting sites and freeware download websites.


Users infect computers through these channels when they download and execute malicious files, which are often disguised as legitimate and regular. Software 'cracking' tools supposedly activate licensed software free of charge (illegally), however, rather than activating anything, they often install malicious programs.


Additionally, use Microsoft Office versions released after 2010. Malicious programs also proliferate through untrusted download channels (e.g. unofficial and free file-hosting sites, Peer-to-Peer sharing networks and other third party downloaders), illegal software activation ("cracking") tools, and fake updaters.


Some ransomware-type infections are designed to encrypt files within external storage devices, infect them, and even spread throughout the entire local network. For this reason, it is very important to isolate the infected device (computer) as soon as possible.


This, however, is rare. In most cases, ransomware infections deliver more direct messages simply stating that data is encrypted and that victims must pay some sort of ransom. Note that ransomware-type infections typically generate messages with different file names (for example, "_readme.txt", "READ-ME.txt", "DECRYPTION_INSTRUCTIONS.txt", "DECRYPT_FILES.html", etc.). Therefore, using the name of a ransom message may seem like a good way to identify the infection. The problem is that most of these names are generic and some infections use the same names, even though the delivered messages are different and the infections themselves are unrelated. Therefore, using the message filename alone can be ineffective and even lead to permanent data loss (for example, by attempting to decrypt data using tools designed for different ransomware infections, users are likely to end up permanently damaging files and decryption will no longer be possible even with the correct tool).


Another way to identify a ransomware infection is to check the file extension, which is appended to each encrypted file. Ransomware infections are often named by the extensions they append (see files encrypted by Qewe ransomware below).


One of the easiest and quickest ways to identify a ransomware infection is to use the ID Ransomware website. This service supports most existing ransomware infections. Victims simply upload a ransom message and/or one encrypted file (we advise you to upload both if possible).


If your data happens to be encrypted by ransomware that is not supported by ID Ransomware, you can always try searching the internet by using certain keywords (for example, a ransom message title, file extension, provided contact emails, crypto wallet addresses, etc.).


Run the Recuva application and follow the wizard. You will be prompted with several windows allowing you to choose what file types to look for, which locations should be scanned, etc. All you need to do is select the options you're looking for and start the scan. We advise you to enable the "Deep Scan" before starting, otherwise, the application's scanning capabilities will be restricted.


Wait for Recuva to complete the scan. The scanning duration depends on the volume of files (both in quantity and size) that you are scanning (for example, several hundred gigabytes could take over an hour to scan). Therefore, be patient during the scanning process. We also advise against modifying or deleting existing files, since this might interfere with the scan. If you add additional data (for example, downloading files/content) while scanning, this will prolong the process:


Partition management: We recommend that you store your data in multiple partitions and avoid storing important files within the partition that contains the entire operating system. If you fall into a situation whereby you cannot boot the system and are forced to format the disk on which the operating system is installed (in most cases, this is where malware infections hide), you will lose all data stored within that drive. This is the advantage of having multiple partitions: if you have the entire storage device assigned to a single partition, you will be forced to delete everything, however, creating multiple partitions and allocating the data properly allows you to prevent such problems. You can easily format a single partition without affecting the others - therefore, one will be cleaned and the others will remain untouched, and your data will be saved. Managing partitions is quite simple and you can find all the necessary information on Microsoft's documentation web page.


We recommend using Microsoft OneDrive for backing up your files. OneDrive lets you store your personal files and data in the cloud, sync files across computers and mobile devices, allowing you to access and edit your files from all of your Windows devices. OneDrive lets you save, share and preview files, access download history, move, delete, and rename files, as well as create new folders, and much more.


In this menu, you can choose to backup the Desktop and all of the files on it, and Documents and Pictures folders, again, with all of the files in them. Click Start backup.


Then, navigate to OneDrive, right-click anywhere in the window and click Paste. Alternatively, you can just drag and drop a file into OneDrive. OneDrive will automatically create a backup of the folder/file.


All of the files added to the OneDrive folder are backed up in the cloud automatically. The green circle with the checkmark in it indicates that the file is available both locally and on OneDrive and that the file version is the same on both. The blue cloud icon indicates that the file has not been synced and is available only on OneDrive. The sync icon indicates that the file is currently syncing.


2. On the Restore your OneDrive page, select a date from the drop-down list. Note that if you're restoring your files after automatic ransomware detection, a restore date will be selected for you.


Once the Blue Eagle virus has encrypted files it will show the ransom note in attempt to gather a ransom. The ransom note says Saher Blue Eagle Products and Note This is a Fake Bitcoin, Just this Virus for Malware information Destruction.


Like most ransomware infections, the Blue Eagle virus is typically distributed by email spam messages that contain malicious 7zip, 7z, rar, docx, and zip email attachments. Once the attachment is downloaded and executed it will spread the malware across the machine and begin its encryption process.


The Blue Eagle removal guide on this page explains how to remove Blue Eagle virus, ransomware, malware, and decrypt .SaherBlueEagleRansomware files. Follow each step below to remove this infection and secure your computer from malicious threats. On the bottom of this guide you will also find recovery and decryption software for various ransomware infections.


If a restore point has previously been established on your machine you will be able to perform a system restore in order to restore your machine to a date and time before it was infected. You will lose files on your computer that were obtained prior to the restore point.


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